Sunday, September 30, 2012

Why Numbers Aren’t Enough: Challenges to Gender Equity in South Africa

Author: Jumoke Balogun

South Africa (SA) has the 7th highest number of female parliamentarians in the world. Even more remarkable, seven African countries rank in the top twenty in this category. The political representation, however, has not translated to real, societal attitudinal changes. Jumoke Balogun shows how the messy national politics in South Africa is still tinged with sexism, proving that the quotas aren’t enough women still have a long way to go in reversing long-held beliefs.

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 5)

Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Susan Rice and America’s “Our Son-of-a-Bitch” Policy

Author: Olaana Abbaaxiiqii

America's Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice gave a very nice eulogy at Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi's funeral recently. Her eulogy, according to Olaana Abbaaxiiqii, examplified America's belief that the man, though evidently one of Africa's brutal dictators, being one of Washington's men was enough to exonerate him. Washington is ever so willing to turn a blind eye to its proxies on the continent, and is willing to provide the political cover for its chosen few.

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Becoming an Ophthalmologist in Burkina Faso

Author: Sam Gradess

Sam Gradess chronicles his time in Burkina Faso as a development volunteer with the U.S. Peace Corps. His observations show an experience different from anything he has come across in the past - Burkinabés have their own way of doing things and it works.

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Africa Deserves Better Leaders

Author: Edson Charikinya

Africa’s leadership process needs a revamp. It has failed the continent’s billion-plus citizens for a very long time. Opposition parties all over the continent, coming into office riding popular waves of hope for change, often revert to the practices of their predecessors. The international community has also been fooled into committing to African leaders who taut respect for human rights and support for democracy just to win approval from Washington. Edson Charinkinya argues that a revamped process would need public discourse, proper scrutiny of Africa’s opposition parties to break the cycle.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

China vs. United States: Perhaps a Deadly Competition for Africa

Author: Staff Writer

Africa’s resources are again in high demand from the world’s industrially developed nations. Two in particular are geared to make the most of this competition – U.S. and China. In their efforts to win lie many unknowns, though there is a possibility Africa could become a victim of their rapacious appetites. A continent of nations led by corrupt governments, coupled with wealthy suitors capable and willing to do anything for more of what their economies and global status need is a very bad mix, to say the least.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Africa: Is it Really a Shared Identity, or Merely a Name?

Author: Mohamed Toure

The author explores a fundamental question: what is Africa and what does it mean to be African? Visiting the cultural and economic commonalities among Africans, the author seeks a definition for the term ‘Africa’ beyond a mere label for a geographical region. A continent with a complex history and demography may prove hard to fit into a singular cultural identity. In the least, overarching economic interests will define the continent’s common identity and shared vision of a future prosperity.

Sunday, September 9, 2012

The Big Man’s ‘Second Fiddle’

Author: Declan Galvin

A dead king with no apparent heir often leaves a volatile and unpredictable court. Declan Galvin shows why the next “Big Man” in Ethiopia is not exactly easy to predict. Whoever takes power after the unexpected death of Meles Zenawi will however have to play the game – you need many henchmen to be the King!

Simplicity and Technology: Deciding When to K.I.S.S.

Author: Christopher Guess

Christopher Guess takes us on a journey on his encounter with a young inquisitive mind in the slums of Arusha, Tanzania. The charm of two unrelenting boys brings him to an interesting revelation – simplicity is expensive, though necessary when it comes to technology.

Friday, September 7, 2012

Naija No Dey Carry Last: Understanding the Psyche of a Nation

Author: Tundé Oyateru

Tunde Oyateru examines in simple relatable terms how Nigeria’s sense of exceptionalism has led to a jaded sense of entitlement and accomplishment. And, more importantly, how it disallows Nigerians from realistically addressing the country’s problems. It highlights Nigeria’s penchant for pointing to worse circumstances to escape from truly critically dealing with the nation’s failings.

South Africa: A Country At War With Itself

Author: Edson Charikinya

South Africa, not immune from the global economic downturn, is facing serious economic problems mixed with the country’s complex domestic politics. Still dealing with the consequences of pre-apartheid policies, its citizens are no longer patiently waiting for economic equality. Edson Charikinya opines on why South Africa is currently a house divided upon itself.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 4)


Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.