Showing posts with label africa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label africa. Show all posts

Monday, November 12, 2012

9 Signs the Journalism on Africa You've Just Encountered Is Trash

Author: Imran Garda

News coverage of Africa has drastically reduced over the decade. So too has the quality of coverage of the continent. Well below journalistic standards, reports from and representation of the continent do not reflect the actualities on the ground. In the end, the Africa on the television set is far from reality and suffers from a perception problem.

Saturday, November 3, 2012

Still Minority Status for the African Woman

Author: Adeline T. Massima

Something has changed in the last fifty years for women in Africa. Increasing numbers of democratic governments on the continent has meant increasing representation. Though, where it is, and where it should be is still quite far apart. The truth is that African women still hold a minority status.


Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Global Warming: Africa’s New Chains of Poverty?

Author: Adeline T. Massima

Global warming could put Africa on the back foot after the continent has managed to make some lost ground. Unfortunately, the worst-case scenario, according to the science, could snuff this nascent progress. In fact, it could bind Africa in a new cycle of poverty and aid dependency to the West.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

Dementia: Not Just The “White Man’s Disease”

Author: Staff Writer

Dementia is soon to be a problem in African countries. This class of diseases is not well diagnosed because much of the continent’s health systems lack the tools. But the biggest problem is that little attention is being paid to dementia’s potential cost in the near future.

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 5)

Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Africa Deserves Better Leaders

Author: Edson Charikinya

Africa’s leadership process needs a revamp. It has failed the continent’s billion-plus citizens for a very long time. Opposition parties all over the continent, coming into office riding popular waves of hope for change, often revert to the practices of their predecessors. The international community has also been fooled into committing to African leaders who taut respect for human rights and support for democracy just to win approval from Washington. Edson Charinkinya argues that a revamped process would need public discourse, proper scrutiny of Africa’s opposition parties to break the cycle.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

China vs. United States: Perhaps a Deadly Competition for Africa

Author: Staff Writer

Africa’s resources are again in high demand from the world’s industrially developed nations. Two in particular are geared to make the most of this competition – U.S. and China. In their efforts to win lie many unknowns, though there is a possibility Africa could become a victim of their rapacious appetites. A continent of nations led by corrupt governments, coupled with wealthy suitors capable and willing to do anything for more of what their economies and global status need is a very bad mix, to say the least.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Africa: Is it Really a Shared Identity, or Merely a Name?

Author: Mohamed Toure

The author explores a fundamental question: what is Africa and what does it mean to be African? Visiting the cultural and economic commonalities among Africans, the author seeks a definition for the term ‘Africa’ beyond a mere label for a geographical region. A continent with a complex history and demography may prove hard to fit into a singular cultural identity. In the least, overarching economic interests will define the continent’s common identity and shared vision of a future prosperity.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 4)


Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 3)


Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

“Shale Gas” Is Africa’s Game-Changer: Let’s Forget About Climate Change For Now

Author: Edson Charikinya

Shale gas could transform Africa into a power giant. It can provide the continent’s energy requirement now and for the longterm. Edson Charikinya looks at how this form of energy can keep the light on for a long time to come, in addition to the environmental opposition to this known hydrocarbon energy form.

Straight Talk on the International Criminal Court in Africa


Author: Declan Galvin

The ICC has been a source of controversy in Africa. On many occasions it has been the court of last resort for Justice. However, many criticize what appears to be its target list, which chiefly has just African countries. Declan Galvin argues that the continent’s justice gap is what the ICC has always tried to cover.

Saturday, August 18, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 2)

Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also traveled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the regions politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Things Fall (Falling) Apart: One Man's Take on Nigeria's Dramas (Part 1)

Author: Alan Titley

Alan Titley spent two years in Africa (1967-69) as a young Irish teacher during the Nigerian Civil War. He also travelled throughout West Africa in those years and witnessed much of what was going on in the region’s politics and social life. These brief essays attempt to tell some small part of his experience and his reflections on African, specifically Nigerian politics today.

Security That Stinks!

Author: Declan Galvin

Africa’s security matters are serious, but could one provide insight into some of the continent’s current security sagas from a not-so-serious vantage point like, say, fish?  Well, that’s what Declan Galvin did. Fish can explain a lot, and in this piece he writes about how Africa’s fish is a crucial element to the politics of the continent.

Militant Islam: How Africa’s Political Reform Could Make A Difference

Author: Staff Writer

What could stop militant Islam in its tracks? Political Islam. The author argues that extremists given a chance to fully participate in the democratic system of governance are often forced to include popular and secular elements into their platforms. Since in order for them to gain a majority or be part of a controlling block, extremist groups often have to negotiate away the most extreme aspects of their ideologies; democratic governance lures them further into the mainstream. The alternative, excluding these groups, he argues, is what forces extremist to become radicals.

Thursday, August 2, 2012

If You Get Malaria, Stay in Africa

Author: Christopher Guess

I was walking through my old university campus a few years ago on assignment to cover a student group for a regional newspaper when I heard the standard call of a pedestrian: “Excuse me, do you have a few spare minutes?!” I turned around and a very nice undergraduate explained to me that they were raising money for World Malaria Day and asked if I was familiar with it.  I told her that I was and that I had, in fact, almost died from the disease a year earlier.  The students were stunned.  They began bombarding me with questions and, after answering as many as I could, I apologized and ran to meet up with the subjects of my story.

This encounter has always left me thinking.  Malaria, a disease which impacts more lives than almost any other disease in human history, is still shrouded in such a blackout of information.  Honestly, I cannot attest or speak conclusively to what most Westerners know or think of malaria.  I won’t rehash the fatality rates, the infections rates or the benefits of mosquito nets. Thanks to the likes of the Bill and Melinda Gate’s foundations those realities are becoming well known.  But it seems to me that most people don’t realize how utterly common malaria is in most of the developing world and how it isn’t the death sentence that it appears to be in the West.

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Mobile Banking Without Debit Cards or Bank Accounts

Author: Christopher Guess

Banks have been spending the better part of the last four years on the front page of every major newspaper in the world.  They have been derided as gluttonous and greedy, existing in large part only to keep themselves in business. There’s no doubt that that is sometimes the case and this certainly pertains to some banks, especially on the investment side of the industry. Despite the understandable animosity people hold towards these institutions, a world without a place to deposit and withdraw cash would be a very difficult one to live in.  This is especially true when the physical distances that modern life and business inhabit these days are taken into account.  While you and I would not think twice about writing a check for a debt owed, we can only do that because we can assume the recipient on the other end has the means and ability to cash it.  It’s quite nice that we can also assume that if you mail the check it will get there safely and not doctored.  These are all very much “first world” assumptions.

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Africa's Brain Shortage

Author: Edson Charikinya

The Battle to Brigde the Technology Gap

Africa, over the last decade, has been recording positive economic growth rates. This growth is due to the current global demand for raw materials and fossil-fuel energy rather than sound macroeconomic policies by African governments. The economic growth surge in China and its investments in Africa have contributed significantly to improving the GDP of most resource-rich African countries.


However, to maintain this positive growth trend, Africa needs to quickly adapt to new technologies in all its economic sectors in order to bridge the technology gap that currently exist between Africa and the developed world. Africa’s ability to create, acquire and adapt to new technology at a faster rate than present is crucial in ensuring the continent’s ability to compete successfully in the global economy. To drive this technology advancement process, Africa needs doctorate holders to play a crucial role in developing its human capacity, as well as policy formulation.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

A Huge Loss To Africa’s Economy

Author: Edson Charikinya

Poor Intra-Africa Air Service Is Sapping The Continent’s Commercial Potential

The high cost of air travel between African cities highlights a scarcity of intra-Africa air services on the continent. This is despite the current positive economic growth being experienced on the continent and the emergence of a growing middle class population that can afford air travel.  The shortage of intra-Africa air services is depriving African cities of revenue from sectors that are heavily dependent on air travel such as tourism. Failure to move goods over long distances across Africa has also restricted the growth of intra-Africa trade.  This is despite renewed urgency by African governments to boost intra-Africa trade, which currently is between 10% to 12% of total continental trade. To deal with this African countries need to liberalise their individual air services industry.